How You Can Give Back this Holiday Season

At Curtis Food Recruiters, volunteering in our community has always been a fundamental core value for us. After such a long and challenging year, our team felt especially moved this holiday season to raise awareness throughout our networks on the importance of giving back. 

It didn’t take us long to single out a cause that we felt was especially vital after the events of this year: food banks. 

The charitable food system is a critical service for people in need in nearly every community across the United States. As financial hardships have increased dramatically due to the effects of the pandemic, hunger is becoming an even more prevalent concern than during the financial crisis of 2008. 

The term “food insecurity” describes when a person lacks consistent access to enough food for an active, healthy life. Today, more than 80% of food banks are serving more people than they were a year ago, and the number of people who are food insecure in the US could rise to more than 50 million by the end of the year, including 17 million children.

Feeding America, one of the nation’s largest anti-hunger organizations, distributed 4.2 billion meals from March through October. The organization has seen a 60 percent average increase in food bank users during the pandemic: about 4 in 10 are first-timers.” 

More than just sharing statistics, though, we wanted to give readers a more involved look at the impact of food banks on their communities, so we reached out to one of our local favorites in our home state of Minnesota: CROSS Services. 

For years, we’ve held CROSS near and dear to our hearts for their incredible service to communities across Minnesota by providing food assistance programs, financial assistance programs, kids programs, and much more. 

We wanted to offer our readers the chance to get to know CROSS a little bit better and, more importantly, the people they work so hard to help.

 

Thankfully, Elizabeth Brown, CEO of CROSS Services was generous enough to sit down with us and answer a few questions:

 

Could you educate readers about the current hunger issues in the community? 

There are several food sites popping up here and there for “short-term” gap-filling, but this is not the work that CROSS does with families. Not having enough food or not being able to pay your rent/mortgage, not being able to put gas in your car to get to work…These are just the result of so many other areas of need.  

Many people have lost jobs they have held for years; their entire industry is damaged in some cases and they might not have a job to go back to. As an example, one family came in with this situation:  

Not only had they lost their job and needed food and housing help, they feared there was no option to go back into that industry. Our Family Resource Manager provided the food, the housing support, and then connected them to a free job counseling service. The father stopped in last week to thank the CROSS staff person and let him know that he was starting a new job in a new industry this week. It’s never just about hunger – hunger is the sign that much more help is needed. This is where CROSS steps in to be that connector.

Could you clear up any confusion about the types of people who receive help through your organization? 

Many people needing services during this time are new to asking for help. CROSS is seeing many families never before needing these services.  

60% of those coming to CROSS are working at least one job (many working more than one job); even during a “normal” time in our world, it is very difficult to stay ahead of rent/mortgage, transportation costs, health insurance, and raising children.  

Many people making even $17 per hour, which is a good wage, have no funds left each month after just paying for housing, transportation, and child care so they can work. This is where CROSS comes in to help families through with more than just food and housing. We provide the connection to the community and to other resources, here at CROSS and across our region.

 What’s the best way for people to donate?

There are a lot of great options to give. It could be through a cash donation, or volunteering your time; no amount is too small. Look at your charity’s website for preferred options for donating. In addition to traditional methods, many are using technology such as Venmo, Square or Paypal to make giving as easy as possible. In Minnesota, you could also go to GiveMN.org which allows you to find and support various charities all from one website; look for similar organizations in your state for online giving.

Is there anything else you think is important to know for people looking to give back this holiday season?

The holiday season is traditionally stressful…I heard one mom say that it is just MORE of everything.  You have to do everything you have always done to survive, and during the holidays, it’s just MORE…Leaving people tired, frustrated, poorer, and more anxious…In this time of “just MORE” we need to also have MORE patience, MORE faith, and MORE care for others.

CROSS will continue to do our work as faithfully and compassionately as we always have. We are grateful and dependent on the community for allowing us to do this work for families in our community.

——

 

For more information on how a donation to CROSS can help Minnesota families in need, take a look at their website here. To find other food shelves in your area in Minnesota, use this helpful tool

 

The impact of organizations like CROSS depends largely on donations and volunteers from their communities. To find a local food bank near you, follow this link. 

Posted in Uncategorized

5 COVID-Related Insights From Food Quality Assurance Executives 

As a food industry-focused recruiting firm, we have witnessed first-hand some drastic changes in the food manufacturing and retail worlds over the past eight months. After many conversations with food safety industry experts, we felt it would be informative and useful to share some insights from top food industry QA leaders. 

Basic Human Needs Are The Most Important 

We need food, shelter, and water to survive, but these essential life ingredients are often taken for granted. This point was summed up perfectly during an interview with Harry, a Technical Manager of a $2 billion private-label prepared food manufacturer.

“The value of basic human needs is still the highest in human life. When this pandemic was at its peak, people were not worried about their cars, vacations, or luxuries; they were focused on providing food, water, and shelter,” said Harry. “We can be so technologically advanced and can make groundbreaking innovations, but food, water, air, and shelter are still the most important needs we have.”

Hygiene Awareness and Improvement is Paying Off

Food quality assurance executives across the board have unanimously agreed that hygiene awareness has noticeably improved since COVID-19 began. 

Harry also elaborated on the importance of hygiene when we asked him about this critical issue. “We always have struggled to communicate, train, and coach people on the importance of hygiene. Now, people are more aware of the importance of proper handwashing and hand sanitation to prevent cross-contamination.” He went on to say, “The consumer has and will continue to benefit tremendously from improved hygiene practices. If we look at data from March 2020 to now, we’ve nationally seen fewer recalls in the food industry. This pandemic taught us to cover our mouths while sneezing, wash our hands, sanitize our hands, sanitize our kitchens, and it even helped significantly fight the common flu. The number of people with common flu decreased significantly, which is a direct result of hygiene best practices.”

Pre-COVID, there was a perception that you were dedicated and selfless if you came to work sick. Now we see that staying home until you are well can help protect the workforce and the public. 

According to Joan Menke-Schaenzer, Chief Quality Officer at Van Druen Farms,The food safety and quality assurance protocols have always been strong, but now we are more focused on heightened cleaning of high touch areas,” said Joan. “I believe that the temperature and health screening of employees will continue forever. There is a new perception of personal health; we pay people not to come to work if they are sick. This has enhanced the safety of our employees.”  

Empowering the Workforce Through Increased Trust

Trust has always been a critical ingredient for success in virtually every business. During the early stages of the pandemic, most businesses changed overnight. They relied on their workforce to band together to overcome the onslaught of new challenges, including remote work, flexible hours, and more. 

“One of the most significant positive changes is that companies working remotely are getting into the culture of trusting the integrity of their employees and moving away from micromanagement,” said Harry. 

This has continued to play out more and more as companies move away from the traditional 9-5 office culture and replace it with flexible hours. Employers are trusting their employees more than ever to get the job done on their schedules. 

Technology Must Be Embraced

There are several long-standing norms around embracing change and innovation throughout the food safety industry, but since COVID, businesses have had no choice but to rapidly embrace technology and adapt to the new normal to survive today’s economic conditions. 

We asked a trusted Senior Food Safety Consultant in our network about the positive changes they’ve seen due to COVID. “The positive changes I have seen include rapidly embracing technology and adaptable approaches to work,” she said. “I believe shattering these long-standing norms has opened the industry to embrace change and innovation in ways never imaginable. Specific to food safety, we are very fortunate COVID is an enveloped virus and food is not a primary vector. Overall, this issue has opened people’s eyes to monitoring for infectious disease and basic GMPs.”

Embracing technology benefits food safety leaders in many ways. The Senior Food Safety Consultant went on to say, “I hope to see emerging technologies like Ozone/UV combined with traditional technologies to address pathogens and heat/acid resistant non-enveloped viruses for a safer food supply. I see this disruption has caused all companies to look more closely at their supply chain and demand planning systems.”

Speed and Adaptability Are Critical For Growth

Speed and adaptability have always been critical to the food safety industry. With COVID, it’s imperative to evolve at light speed to successfully tackle the frequent changes in food safety measures. 

“The rapid shifts in our understanding of COVID drove almost daily changes in procedures at the onset,” said the Senior Food Safety Consultant.  

“Historically, an emerging trend might require a tweak or procedural change. The early onset of COVID required very rapid (and almost perpetual) risk assessment and implementation. The PDCA cycle time also shifted rapidly.” 

Additionally, many food manufacturing businesses have adapted by establishing close partnerships with local public health officials. 

“At Van Druen Farms, we had the local hospital come on-site to test all 500 employees at no cost to them, and we were given results quickly. I am in constant communication with public health and the local county infectious disease expert,” said Joan. She went on to say “My role is currently incorporating more communication with public health and the community.  We can’t live with blinders on and know that employees are living their lives outside of their work at the plant.  We educate and help make change.”  

In Conclusion

COVID-19 has presented new challenges and paradigm shifts to the food industry. Despite all of the new hurdles, the food industry remains resilient and adaptable, continuously evolving to deliver the highest standard of safety.

About Curtis Food Recruiters 

As a full-service executive search firm, Curtis Food Recruiters has successfully matched skilled job seekers with prominent businesses throughout the food manufacturing and grocery retail industry for over a decade. If you’re searching for your next top performer or need help advancing your career, contact us today and we’ll leverage our vast industry experience to move your hiring needs forward. 

* Some of the executives we talked to preferred to remain anonymous or use their first name only.

Opening the Door to an Executive Recruiter

Are you open to a new opportunity? If so, you are in the right place.  

This blog will equip you with actionable tips to help find your next rewarding career opportunity while highlighting the advantages of partnering with an executive recruiter in your hunt.    

Regardless of your situation, you may feel a bit discouraged in your job search. You’re not alone. Nationally, the hiring process has taken a lot longer than usual, with many leadership roles being put on hold midstream until organizations can confidently get through COVID-related challenges.

The good news is the economy is beginning to thaw; it’s just a little slower than we all hoped. But fear not, there WILL be another leadership position coming your way, and a great tip to speed up the job-seeking process is to work with an executive recruiter.

Why Work With an Executive Recruiter?

As a job seeker, there’s a variety of reasons why working with a seasoned recruiter can help streamline and improve your job search, but for the sake of time, we’ll cover two of the greatest benefits: 

  • Broadens Your Network – Very few professionals have a network as vast and as well-connected as a recruiter. Working with a recruiter opens the door to their massive network, giving you a competitive hiring advantage.
  • Partner For Your Job Search – Your recruiter is your hiring ally. They have your best interests in mind and genuinely want to help prepare you with details about the company, role and leadership team.  

What Type of Executive Recruiter Should I Work With: Retained or Contingent?

Understanding the difference between working with a retained recruiter and a contingent recruiter is vital to determine which is best for your unique situation.  

  • Retained Recruiter – A retained recruiter works on an exclusive basis for a client. They typically have a close relationship with the employer and know the culture, the history, and the leadership team. They are focused on finding the right combination of education, skills, leadership style, and contribution to their client’s culture. 
  • Contingent Recruiter – Contingent recruiters are typically generalists who work with various industries and types of positions. They do not often have an exclusive relationship with the employer; the employer only pays the contingent firm once they place a candidate. 

It’s important to note that employers often have relationships with both. In general, contingent recruiters are best at filling junior-level roles and are willing to market your resume to multiple potential employers. Retained recruiters are better suited for senior-level leadership positions that often require a particular skill set. Many of their roles are critical hires, confidential or immediate needs.  

Job Hunting Tips From Our Top Recruiters

With a combined fifty years of experience connecting job seekers to meaningful employment opportunities, the team at Curtis Food Recruiters put their heads together to develop five tips that will help you land your next role faster. 

Get Active in Your Network

It’s easy to take your network for granted while you’re gainfully employed. You might attend an occasional conference, belong to a professional association or have colleagues that you network with, but for the most part, you’re busy with life and work. It is important to continually refresh both professional and networking relationships.  

While 2020 has presented some unique challenges in networking, it’s a great time to pick up the phone and reach out to colleagues you have worked with in the past. People are willing to have those conversations now more than ever. It’s a great way to stay on someone’s radar. 

Additionally, you’d be surprised how many professional organizations are hosting virtual meetings. Be sure to engage in those meetings and aim to be an active participant – it certainly can’t hurt!

Get Social

Take time to be active on social media platforms, especially LinkedIn. This shows prospective employers that you are a thought leader. Write engaging posts, share interests, and interact (liking, commenting, and sharing) with potential employers. Ensure that your social media profile is exactly how you want to present yourself. Consider taking down pictures or posts that do not represent you in a professional way.

Keywords and Key Phrases 

Take a look at your online profiles (LinkedIn, Monster, etc.) and determine what keywords and key phrases a potential employer is using as search terms. To start, review the job descriptions for any positions that you’re interested in. Write down as many keywords and phrases that seem relevant to your next role. 

Now that you have your list, spend some time thinking (and writing down) experiences that you have had. Challenging problems you have solved. Outstanding successes you have had in current/past employers. Write 2-3 sentences that describe the type of position you are most qualified for, and then add the keywords and phrases that are relevant. Adding concrete data and real numbers is a huge advantage, if possible (i.e. “Grew manufacturing sales by 15%”).  

Flexible Resumes

Keeping your resume flexible and making sure it is specifically tailored to the role you’re interested in is critical. There’s nothing that says, “average” to a potential employer more than having a generic resume. Take time to customize your resume for each job application you send. This doesn’t have to be anything elaborate; simply updating job descriptions and experiences accurately to reflect the relevant position is a great way to show your interest.

Interviewing

You’re likely to have interviews, but they may look a little different. Video interviewing is pretty much industry standard right now, so be sure to have a decent internet connection and proper attire. It’s also incredibly vital to embrace the importance of listening and not over-sharing. Practice and be prepared to speak to all aspects of your career that make you stand out, and be able to explain how those experiences will make you successful in the role you are interviewing for. After the interview, be sure to follow up with a thank you, and if you don’t end up getting the job, ask for feedback – positive and critical. Accept rejection gracefully. 

Using one or all of these tips will certainly help you get ahead. Here’s the bottom line: reach out and connect with people. You never know who knows someone looking for your exact background, expertise and personality. Your recruiting partner is your best advocate, so when in doubt, reach out. Good luck!  

About Curtis Food Recruiters 

For over a decade, Curtis Food Recruiters has been matching food and beverage professionals with prominent, rewarding career opportunities. As a full-service executive search firm specializing in the food manufacturing and grocery retail industries, we are dedicated to helping job seekers find (and land) the perfect positions. Contact us today so we can do the same for you. 

Recruiting Diverse Talent in the Food Industry: Strategies for Success

Just over 50 percent of food industry professionals are racially diverse, making the food industry the most diverse workforce in the nation. 

However, it has an unpleasant truth. 

That unpleasant truth is the massive representation gap in senior leadership positions. 

As a woman-owned executive search firm specializing in placing talent in the food and beverage industry, we pride ourselves on our track record of over half of Curtis Foods Recruiter’s placements are people of color and females.

This blog aims to share with you five strategies we have learned over 14 years in business to help food and consumer packaged goods leaders hire diverse talent. 

Remove Unconscious Bias 

Before actively recruiting for executive diverse talent, it’s extremely important to understand unconscious bias.  

What is Unconscious Bias?  

Research has uncovered that as humans, we use different sections of our brains to process interactions with people who are similar to us compared with people who are different. Upon first glance of someone different, we have an unconscious tendency to judge them based on stereotypes, appearance, skills and ultimately, whether they should be hired or interviewed.

It’s important to note that experiencing unconscious bias doesn’t make you a bad person. Even the best-intended individuals go through unconscious biases on a regular basis all without ever knowing it.  

How to Reduce it 

Tackling this invisible barrier is not something that occurs overnight, it takes time, practice, and the right tools. The first step to reducing unconscious bias is to recognize when it happens. We strongly recommend reading any or all of these 11 Must-Read Books on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion to help. 

In addition, there are several strategies you can deploy now to limit unconscious bias in your recruiting efforts. 

Ensure Your Job Descriptions are not Deterring People from Different Groups from Applying

Determine what aspects of the role are required and what aspects others can bring to the role. Is a bachelor’s degree truly required to be successful in this role? Could prior experiences determine this person’s ability to be successful in the job? Be clear in the job posting which requirements are critical and which are a plus – women are often deterred from applying for a role if they don’t meet all requirements in the job posting.  

Be Strategic with Your Interviewing 

When interviewing, ensure that there are rubrics established for the interviewers to evaluate the candidates against the requirements of the role. Be able to quantify intangibles that come out of the meeting so they can be measured equitably. 

Cultural Competence  

Be aware that some traits may be valued more than others, and some may be misinterpreted (such as eye contact, expressiveness, and close communication for example). Be prepared to ask more questions if the hiring manager doesn’t want to move forward with a candidate to determine exactly what their hesitations may be.

Leverage Sourcing Tools  

Harness the power of an artificial intelligence sourcing tool to intelligently remove unconscious bias so your team can have a bias-free candidate pool. 

Aim for Half of Your Candidates to be Diverse  

The golden rule of recruiting is to simply hire the best possible candidate regardless of race, orientation, gender, and ethnicity.  

The biggest obstacle to achieving this is often when diversity is not represented in the candidate pool. To prevent this, we found that having a goal of at least 50 percent of candidates being from diverse backgrounds is critical to ensure you’re getting the best possible candidate. In our experience, more than half of the time the final candidate happens to be diverse and the best cultural contribution. 

Get Creative with Your Recruiting  

Searching for qualified, leadership-level diverse talent may seem extremely difficult at first, but in reality, it just takes a little creativity and strategy. Here are a few tips collected from our team to help you find your next qualified diverse candidate.  

Network with Diversity Groups 

Join diversity and inclusion LinkedIn groups, attend conferences that attract diverse crowds or cover diverse subjects, and start having meaningful conversations across various networking channels. Here are a few groups we recommend staying in contact with: 

If you’re not having any luck, explore unconventional routes like Reddit, volunteer work, and even community events. 

Ask 

Perhaps the best way to find, engage, and ultimately attract high-level diverse talent is to ask them first-hand where they spend their time. Interview diverse employees, families, and friends to see where they go online and how you could better reach them. Odds are good they would be more than happy to help you on your mission to hire more diverse people. In addition, referrals from diverse hires or employees tend to be more diverse.

Campus Recruiting / Career Fairs 

Attend career fairs in diverse neighborhoods to better connect with the community. Explore campus recruiting programs as a source of talent to build a leadership pipeline for the future.  Even better, offer scholarships and internships to diverse communities as a way to signal your commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Partner with a Search Firm 

Some of the industry’s largest and most qualified diverse talent pools are generally located within the database of recruiting agencies and search firms. Many businesses looking to build up their diverse workforce often partner with search firms to find, vet, and hire diverse talent.  

Consider Relocation 

Another obstacle that plagues most hiring managers looking to bring on diverse executives is recruiting in areas with homogeneous demographics.  

We totally get it, there are definitely many areas throughout the nation with a low percentage of diverse citizens. To help combat this, we often encourage candidates to look outside their comfort zone and consider a new adventure in a new city. Additionally, with COVID-19, many jobs are now able to be remote, which greatly widens the search.  

Champion a Culture of Inclusion 

Diversity and inclusion are one of the top three priorities for nearly every business in 2020 but it’s so much more than just hitting D&I numbers and goals, it’s about building a culture with a foundation of inclusion. When senior leadership is motivated by constructing a culture that is focused on diversity of thought, that is when the door can be open to a more inclusive culture. After all, only 55 percent of global employees feel that their employers were making efforts to build a more inclusive culture.  

Leaders need to be a part of the conversation and take active steps to help the entire organization understand and leverage everyone’s differences. Here’s a few examples of tangible ways your business can build a foundation of inclusion that will attract top-tier diverse talent.  

  • Design a mentorship program that encourages and helps grow women and diverse employees within the organization. 
  • Establish a diversity and inclusion committee that makes sure everyone feels included in the conversation.  
  • Survey employees and ask how your company can better build out a diversity and inclusion foundation. Be prepared to enact changes to meet the employee’s needs. 
  • Clearly define the values of your organization and ensure leaders are accountable to upholding those values.     
  • Ensure that you are developing and advancing the career of diverse employees already at your organization. 
  • Review your interview process over the last year or two and determine where candidates in underrepresented groups have fallen out of the process. Determine where improvements to the process could be made.

We genuinely hope you found this blog helpful on your quest to hire more diversity in executive positions. It’s our sincere goal to help employ more diverse and qualified talent in the food industry. If you have any questions or need any help around hiring diverse talent, we’d love to connect! 

About Curtis Food Recruiters 

As a full-service executive search firm, Curtis Food Recruiters is in a unique position that allows us to independently evaluate food manufacturing and grocery retail companies’ hiring processes, from the perspective of both the talent acquisition team and the candidate. Contact us today and we’ll leverage our vast industry experience to ensure you not only attract—but keep—the best diverse talent on the market.

A Guide to In-Person Interviews During Covid-19

*This article is merely food for thought. Please follow your state and local guidelines.

We are all well aware of how greatly COVID-19 has impacted our day-to-day lives. While we strive for a return to normal, we know that our in-person interview process will require a “new normal.”

Companies are still hiring, and many roles cannot be filled without an on-site interview. Begin by determining the roles where an offer can be comfortably made through video interviews and which roles truly require an on-site interview.

The following are a few suggestions for employers on how to conduct those interviews as safely as possible and keep your candidate and staff feeling comfortable with the process.   

Gone are the interviews full of handshakes, office tours, lunches, and dinners.

Unfortunately, that also takes away the opportunity to get to know candidates on a more relaxed level and vice versa. Reaching out to your candidates ahead of time and letting them know that the interview process has changed due to the current conditions may help to set expectations and ensure that your candidate understands you’re operating out of the utmost concern for safety.

Even though the “warm fuzzy” will not be there, communicating expectations ahead of time will help prevent the candidate from feeling an emotional distance with you and your company.

Steps to take prior to travel and the day of the interview

Before your candidate travels, know that they may have a level of anxiety regarding the unknown situation they are walking into, especially if they’re traveling from out of state. Try to calm that feeling by letting them know specifically how your company will be handling safety while they are interviewing.

  1. Closely monitor for symptoms

Candidates should be asked to monitor their health and surroundings and self-assess prior to travel as well as the day of the interview for symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, etc.). If they are experiencing symptoms, have been directed to self-quarantine, or have been in close contact with anyone in the past 14 days that tested positive for COVID-19, they should notify the interview team and the interview should be rescheduled.

  1. Provide a detailed agenda

Let your candidate know ahead of time who they will be meeting with (include titles) and for how long. Give them details around how breaks will be taken and what facilities will be available to them. Also be sure to provide information on the interview space and your distancing protocols.

  1. Prepare resumes and other items

Make sure to email your interview team a copy of the candidates’ resume that they can print out on their own, in order to help avoid spreading germs. In addition, notify the candidate to bring their own resume, mask, water, and snack if appropriate.

Walk them through the process so they know what to expect

Here are some examples of how you can handle safety during the interview:

  • When your candidate arrives at the facility, let them know that you will greet them without using handshakes.
  • Ask the candidate to wash their hands prior to the meeting.
  • Ensure that everyone the candidate interacts with is wearing a mask and be ready to provide the candidate with a mask if they do not have one.
  • If you need to use an elevator or stairwell, let them know this ahead of time and instruct them that they will be using the elevator alone, or plan on single spacing when using the stairs.
  • For groups, try to meet in a larger or more open conference area.
  • Prior to the interviews, set up tables in a circle, horseshoe, or other format to ensure that people are spaced appropriately apart, yet are still able to see and hear each other clearly.
  • Try to limit the number of people in the group interview to only those that are essential. Consider breaking into two or more interview groups if needed.
  • Have doors propped open when possible.
  • Make disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer readily available to everyone before and after the interviews.
  • Ensure that surfaces throughout the facility are being cleaned and disinfected at regular intervals. Schedule breaks after each interview to sanitize all surfaces in the interview room, including tables, doorknobs, light switches, etc.
  • Ask everyone to wear masks until they are seated at a comfortable distance from others in the interview room.
  • During plant or retail store visits, keep all talking to a minimum and reserve questions until afterward.
  • Provide a virtual tour of the facility wherever possible. Include detailed photos and consider incorporating a virtual guide to give it more of a personal touch.

Don’t forget to follow up with the candidate

Request that the candidate keep you informed if anything changes in their health up to 14 days after your interview.

In addition, consider having each of the interview team members send a personal email to the candidate, especially if it’s someone you decide you want to hire. This will provide a more personal touch and an opportunity to build those individual relationships. If you really want to impress your candidate, consider sending a note or even some company gear to their home.

Final thoughts

We wish you much luck as you navigate these challenging times. Planning ahead and considering all the details of the interview day will provide a level of comfort for the candidate, help your interview team, and ensure a successful interview process while helping keep everyone safe.

Happy hiring!

For more ideas on hiring strategies during these uncertain times, be sure to read Adjusting Your Hiring Process Amidst COVID-19 and Improving Your Hiring Process: How to Keep Candidates from Walking Away.

As a full-service executive search firm, Curtis Food Recruiters is in a unique position that allows us to independently evaluate food manufacturing and grocery retail companies’ hiring processes, from the perspective of both the talent acquisition team and the candidate. Contact us today and we’ll leverage our vast industry experience to ensure you not only attract—but keep—the best talent on the market.

Posted in Uncategorized

Gratitude, Giving & Growth

During these chaotic times, it is more important than ever to make sure we are walking through the world with a grateful heart. That’s not to say that we shouldn’t feel disappointed or grieve the loss of our old routines or cancelled events, quite the contrary is true. By developing an appreciation for even the most difficult days, we appreciate the joyous ones that much more.   

We have found great insight in Annie Meehan’s webinar “The Joy of Missing Out” which focuses on three core principles: Gratitude, Giving & Growth.   

  1. Gratitude – what are you grateful for today? Did you have the privilege of waking up to a loved one or job that you’re passionate about? Did you admire a beautiful sunset or enjoy dinner with your family? This helps you shift your mindset to notice even the little things that are worth celebrating every day.  
  1. Giving – what did you give away today? A compliment? Advice? A kind note? This takes gratitude a step further into true generosity – from self-focused to selfless. Make it a point to do even just small acts of kindness every day. This will not only deepen your relationships, but it will create a more meaningful life. 
  1. Growth – what did you learn or how did you grow today? Did you attend a seminar? Did you watch a TED talk? Did you invite a new neighbor for a virtual coffee date? This takes generosity to the next step – Having a full life is not just about who you are today, it’s also about developing who you want to become. Expanding your universe intellectually, socially, or professionally brings gratitude full circle, allowing you to recognize appreciation for your circumstances that you may not have otherwise.   

We hope you all are surviving this chaos with as much gratitude, generosity & growth as possible!  

If you want to learn more visit https://www.anniemeehan.com

Posted in Uncategorized

Thank you notes

Thank youWhen I receive a  thank you note, whether it is in the mail or electronic it truly one of my favorite things. Not so long ago almost anyone knew how to write a thank you note, so how did we lose this skill?  When I ask my kids about this they respond with ” well I said thank you, isn’t that enough?” Somewhere between rushing to sporting events, concerts and life in general,  I have failed them.  Admitting it is the first step right? My girls are applying for their first jobs this summer and I have created a guideline for them to follow for thank you notes after their interviews, it doesn’t matter if it is your first job at a fast food restaurant or if you are interviewing for a Vice President role the rules are the same.

Following an interview, promptly write the interviewer a letter expressing appreciation and thanks for the interview.  The purpose of this letter is to:

  1. Show appreciation for their interest in you and thank them for taking the time to meet with you.
  2. Let them know that you are interested in the position.
  3. Remind the employer about your qualifications for the position. If you thought of something you forgot to mention in the interview, mention it in the thank-you note.
  4. Show that you have good manners and are thoughtful.
  5. Follow up with any information the employer may have asked you to provide after the interview.

Hand written or electronic?

  1. Thank-you letters can be typed, handwritten or e-mailed.
  2. A well crafted email is perfect for following up on a conversation. Be mindful to send different emails to anyone you send them to.
  3. Handwritten are more personal, and would be appropriate for a hiring manager after you have been offered a position.
  4. E-mail is appropriate, when that has been how you have had contact with the person you want to thank, or if you want to get it to them expeditiously.

You don’t have to write a novel, just three sentences,  a greeting, and a close, are all you need to get this job done. It will get you noticed and I’m sure they will appreciate you taking your time to thank them and if anything you have spread a little kindness into the world!

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Phone Etiquette

PhoneImagine how nervous you are doing one phone interview, as Food Recruiters we can do as many as 5 to 10 phone interviews in one day. Phone interview etiquette is just as important as in-person job interview etiquette when it comes to getting hired. It tells the interviewer a lot if you take the time to give them your full attention and are engaged during the call.  If you’re selected for a phone interview, prepare just as carefully as you would for a  traditional interview.  Research, confirm the date and time, have questions ready for the interviewer and prepare to make a great impression.  Here are additional suggestions for preparation:

Prepare for your day – This might sound strange, but your appearance  matters on the phone almost as much as it does during a face-to-face interview. You will have more confidence dressed in business casual than you will in your pajamas.  A  memorable piece of advice I once received was that “people can hear a smile”. Focus on the interviewer, smile, and think positive. You’ll make a better impression.

Use a land line – Cell phones are wonderful, but not always reliable.   A  dropped call, cellular static  or getting disconnected can ruin an otherwise great interview.

Get rid of the distractions – Interview in a private, quiet space. That means having someone watch your children and kick the dog, the cat, and the rest of the household members out of your interview space. Please, no driving while interviewing. Pull over or schedule another time where you can give the interviewer your full attention.

Be aware of what you are doing Swinging in your chair, pacing the floor or fidgeting can all be heard over the telephone. Tapping on a pencil, clicking a pen and other nervous habits are distracting and come across as lacking self-confidence.  Practice good body language and it will positively affect the tone of your voice. When you feel good you look and sound good. Remember to smile!

Don’t interrupt – Listen carefully to the question and answer the question to the best of your ability. Be concise and to the point without rambling. Be careful not to interrupt the interviewer because you think you know what he or she is about to ask. It is alright to take a few seconds to think before responding, thoughtful answers are best.

Be prepared with questions for your interviewer – When the interviewer asks whether you have any questions for him or her, make sure that you do! Review your questions and have a few ready in advance.  It will show that you have done your research and are interested in the position.

Follow up – Ask for the interviewer’s email address, if you don’t already have it. Send out a thank you immediately, thanking the interviewer and showing your interest in the job. Let them know you are available to answer any other questions they may have.

It comes down to being your best self! Even if the job is not something you might be suited for keep in mind that you are always networking and making those connections so it is important to make a good impression!

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Creating a Safe Haven for Bees and Monarchs, Alexis Hoopman

bee on sunflowerAs I sit outside (on a gorgeous non-snowy day in MN) admiring my garden this summer I am reminded of all of the different articles I have read regarding  bee colony collapse disorder and the significantly dwindling numbers of monarch butterflies. Both play an important role in gardening and our agricultural system as a whole. Wondering what I could do to help with these situations, I did a little research and thought I would share some of the tips and simple steps that I discovered that we can all do to support these invaluable contributors to our gardens and farms.

Bees

Worker bees have been abandoning their queens, and their hives, in record numbers only to die and leave their hives empty. This is a big concern due to the fact that bee pollination adds $15 billion in increased crop value to our country’s agriculture each year. According to the USDA, “About one mouthful in three in our diet directly or indirectly benefits from honey bee pollination.” There are numerous theories that contribute this bee tragedy to everything from pesticides to global changes or even parasites, but an exact cause has yet to be determined. The good news is that we can help the bees.  Planting pollinator friendly plants is a great way to support the bee population. Marigolds, daisies and native plants will keep bees coming back to your yard and pollinating away. In addition, be very discriminating in the pesticides that you choose. The Honeybee Conservancy has a great step by step guide for creating a bee friendly habitat in your own yard. http://thehoneybeeconservancy.org/act-today-2/plant-a-bee-garden/.

Monarch Butterflies

Monarch butterfly populations have also been on the decline in recent years, most likely due to logging in Mexico (where Monarchs like to winter), climate changes and GMO corn which hosts a bacterium that is toxic to butterflies. In addition, many of the herbicides utilized in modern farming kills off the milkweed plants in the fields, which Monarchs prefer to all other plants

 

When you’re in the process of putting together your bee garden, add a bunch of native milkweed plants and you will have a very happy Monarch population to observe as well. Butterflies lay their eggs on milkweeds and their caterpillars utilize the pods as their sole form of nutrition during  this stage of development.  The food and shelter that milkweed plants provide are critical to sustaining the Monarch species. It also happens that honey bees enjoy milkweeds as well, so this is a win-win for both insects

I encourage you to do your own research as you begin to strategize your yard for the summer. There are countless resources available on line, and of course, your local greenhouse or nursery will be happy to help point you in the right direction. It always feels good to help, and this type of help can impact more than just the beauty of your garden, but also the food on your plate .

 

 

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3 fears that trap midlife women in unhappy work -By Kathy Caprino

Virtually every week, I hear from scores of midlife professionals around the globe who long for something more, different or better in their jobs and careers, but can’t seem to get out of the gate to take action or decide the best directions to pursue.

At the heart of these questions is one key element: fear. But fear about career change disguises itself in myriad confusing ways that we don’t recognize as fear. The research I’ve conducted over the past 13 years reveals three top fears that keep midlife professionals locked in unhappy careers and in quiet (and not so quiet) desperation, sometimes for a lifetime.

Here they are:

https://www.newonline.org/news-insights/blog/mid-career/3-fears-trap-midlife-women-unhappy-work

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